Medical Devices

andrea.habura@biocareers.com

Andrea
Habura

Where do you fit?

“Cursed is the man who has found some other man's work and cannot lose it.” – Mark Twain

What is your work, anyway? Not your research project, but your work. The sort of job you’re really suited for.


andrea.habura@biocareers.com

Andrea
Habura

The Packing List

Several years ago, I was doing field research in a remote and extremely cold site, and I had to take a multi-day survival training course before they would let me out on the ice unsupervised. 

On our first day of “Happy Camper School,” my classmates and I were given a list: 

Bring: Extreme Cold Weather gear, extra clothes of choice, sunglasses, full water bottle, camera, pee bottle, sense of humor. Leave behind: Cotton, alcohol, pets, worldly troubles, self-pity.”  


andrea.habura@biocareers.com

Andrea
Habura

Superstition

Admit it: you have a “lucky” PCR machine, don’t you? 

As any experimental biologist can tell you, working at the bench has a strong element of tradition and muscle knowledge. If I’m running a Western blot or pouring a gel, I’ll probably do it a certain way, because that’s the way I was taught, back when I was a fresh-faced young undergraduate, and it’s always worked for me. If the reviewers are happy, I’m happy. But is this the best a scientist can do? Could bench practice be more rational? 


andrea.habura@biocareers.com

Andrea
Habura

The Bones Beneath the Skin

One of the best things about a science education is that it teaches you to see the bones beneath the skin. 

In some cases, literally (hello there, anatomy people!), but mostly in the sense that we learn to see the hidden processes that drive the physical world. Being a scientist means you’ll never look at a seashell or a mai tai quite the same way again


andrea.habura@biocareers.com

Andrea
Habura

Learning to Be a Beginner

Nature recently published an opinion piece about the things budding 21st century scientists need in their training (http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/science/articles/10.1038/nj7560-371a). 


andrea.habura@biocareers.com

Andrea
Habura

Revisited

“What is it that confers the noblest delight? What is that which swells a man's breast with pride above that which any other experience can bring to him? Discovery! 

To know that you are walking where none others have walked; that you are beholding what human eye has not seen before; that you are breathing a virgin atmosphere. 

To give birth to an idea -- to discover a great thought -- an intellectual nugget, right under the dust of a field that many a brain plow had gone over before. 


andrea.habura@biocareers.com

Andrea
Habura

Life Among the Machines

When I meet people at cocktail parties, I tell them I build robots for a living. Which is the truth, but not the whole truth. 


andrea.habura@biocareers.com

Andrea
Habura

Conference Ecology for Job-Hunters

“At scientific conferences, there are three classes of attendees: Eminents, Lowlies, and Everyone Else. Grad students, of course, fall into the Lowlies group. An ecotone, or edge effect, where all three classes come into contact can yield higher biodiversity and productivity than in any one group by itself.” – Stephen Hale. 


andrea.habura@biocareers.com

Andrea
Habura

Literature Review

If you’re trying to make your products better, it’s nice when your customers almost have to fill out a user feedback form. “Publish or perish” is nothing but upside if you want to figure out what scientists are doing in the lab.


andrea.habura@biocareers.com

Andrea
Habura

Playful

You’ve probably seen it; millions of people have. One of the first videos done by the animation company Animusic, Pipe Dream is a fun computer animation of a mechanical percussion orchestra, with little balls caroming off of drums and xylophone keys and cowbells before tucking themselves neatly back into funnels for reuse. It’s fascinating and clever and, when it was made in 2001, completely unrealistic.